43–35 10TH STREET by Daniel Shea

アメリカ人フォトグラファー、ダニエル・シェア(Daniel Shea)の作品集。作者は、新自由主義(ネオリベラリズム)の影響下において自身が何をすべきかはっきりと認識している。かつて工業都市であったロングアイランドシティは、強欲さを感じるほど急速に不動産開発を進めていた。このようなタイプの急発展は世界中で起きており、明らかに遅れた住居不足問題を解決すべく取られた資本主義的な打開策に過ぎなかった。その街の開発における移り変わりを作者は記録し、構築されたコミュニティーの末端から都市の中心部までを描き出す。一冊の本の中で作者は、自身が住むロングアイランドシティを写した記録に加え、モダニズムを象徴する計画都市ブラジリアの政府庁舎、アメリカ西部の国勢調査指定地域として作られた不毛の地サールズ・バレーのイメージを並置。対比的に見せるページもあればあえて重ねあわせる場面も作る。どの写真がどの場所のものかは時に特定し難いが、観ていくうちにそれぞれのイメージが醸し出す印象は確実に積み重なって混ざり合い、共鳴する。作者は建造物の表面や形、デザインに目を向け、その美しさに喜びを感じながらも、同時にモダニズムの野心と失敗が合わさって形成された何かに気づく。自分自身と過剰なまでに向き合い、周囲に広がる世界を記録し形にすることで写真家としての立場に挑む姿は、一種のフェティシズムにも見える。その表層には様々な意味が満ち、時が経つにつれ紐解かれていく。アメリカ人作家ウォルター・ベン・マイケルズ(Walter Benn Michaels)が本書にエッセイを添え、作者の作品が成す層を分解し、その層と層の間に挟まれて存在し表面上はニュートラルに見える下で淀む政治的テーマを明確に示す。本シリーズ作を発表した展覧会が評価され、世界で活躍する35歳以下の現代写真家から選出される「Foam Paul Huf Award」(Foam写真美術館主催)を2018年に受賞。

It is always worth asking if an observer alters the subject they observe: Daniel Shea is acutely aware of his role within the operation of neoliberalism.Shea is based in Long Island City, from where he has observed the rapacious processes of recent real estate development. This book moves us from the end and edges of built community to its inner-city nascence. It combines observations from Shea’s neighbourhood with impressions from the Modernist icon Brasilia and the arid Searles Valley in the American West. These are contrasted and superimposed. Few specificities of the sites can be deciphered, but impressions accumulate and coalesce. Shea looks at architecture: its surfaces, its forms and its designs. In concrete he finds aesthetic pleasure and a connection to Modernism’s aspirations and failures – both ripe for fetishisa- tion. He looks too at reflections, challenging the photographer’s position documenting or fashioning the world around them. These planes are saturated with meanings; with time, connections start to be deciphered. An essay by Walter Benn Michaels in ‘43-35 10th Street’ starts to pull apart the stratifications of Shea’s images, articulating political subjects that roil be- neath overtly neutral surfaces or are caught between their layers. The capitalist market and the facility for speculation, for example, that art and building have in common. That artists personify self-organised, precarious, de-unionised labour while creating intrinsically worthless goods that fuel the market itself, and not necessarily identifying what they do as labour at all. Buildings may be designed to improve equality, but, as Brasilia proved, cannot do so alone. Shea constructs images yet resists communicating a clear message, probing, in Michaels’ words, ‘the symbiotic relation between our aesthetics and our economy.’ 

Daniel Shea has been awarded the Paul Huf award by Foam museum in Amsterdam, a prestigious prize and exhibition given annually to an outstanding photographer under 35. Shea won the award with the series of works published in the weighty book ‘43-35 10th Street’.

by Daniel Shea

REGULAR PRICE ¥9,800

softcover
288 pages
240 x 270 mm
color, black and white
2018

published by KODOJI PRESS